Posted in Beef, Other, Pork, The Hungry Hen, Uncategorized, Veggies w/ Meat

Portabella Mushroom Pizza

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This one, I can never get tired of. I try to stay Gluten Free. I don’t have celiac disease but I do have a sensitivity to Gluten. It bloats me up, makes me where I can’t go to the bathroom OR it makes it where I can’t stay out of a bathroom. Also, it wears me down. I don’t have the energy to push through the day if I am eating Gluten all of the time. Makes me cranky and on edge. It also messes with my sugar. Not sugar as in, I need a shot or a candy bar when it drops. Sugar as in, when it drops, I get really sick to the stomach, weak and a migraine. If I don’t eat protein fast, I’m in trouble. That’s not even mentioning what it does to the bellies of the women in my family. We can go from a size five to a size thirty over night, lol.  Now, I know there are people out there that argue over whether the whole Gluten thing is real– for me, it is real.

Anyone who knows about Gluten, understands what I’m about to say next….

It is pure hell when you are first trying to pull off of it. Not just talking about the symptoms. I’m talking about trying to make a descent meal that doesn’t leave you feeling as though you’re missing out. It’s real hard sitting there while you’re family is gorging out on pizza and you’re trying to choke down yet another salad or baked meat dish that you’ve had a gazillion times.

Standing in the grocery store one night — running late with errands and not feeling like cooking once I got home– my husband suggests grabbing the kids something from the frozen section. After feeling left out one too many times and after he grabbed some frozen pizzas, I finally put my foot down and came up with this. Making my own dang pizza on something I love very, very much– portabella mushrooms. It’s not expensive, and depending on toppings, is very quick. I love Italian Sausage, so that adds a little bit to the time factor, however, this still didn’t take me forever and a day to make. And low and behold when I made it, I didn’t even get a picture of the cooked product — which is why you get the one above– because when I walked out of the room to grab my camera, my husband and kids raised the mushrooms. In fact, the dang frozen pizzas got wasted and tossed in the trash.

Now, the Recipe below is for 8 Mushrooms. And I am crazy for toppings, so I piled them all on. You can adjust the toppings to what you like, though. And you can adjust the amount of mushrooms that you make. You can even adjust the amount of toppings you put on– I like lots of toppings. I don’t have the ounces for the Cans of things I used– like Sliced Olives– but we can all tell the difference between small and large cans. (If you NEED and MUST HAVE ounces, I’ll add them, if you just let me know.) And I don’t buy pre-made Pizza Sauce, either. I make my own. It’s not hard. If you are keen on buying it, go for it, but try my homemade below if you’re ever up for it.

Ready? I’m going to give you the ingredients, some directions and then I’m going to show you how to get the mushrooms ready– with pics. The pictures will be part of the other directions. 

INGREDIENTS

  • 8 Portabellos (When choosing the mushrooms, make sure they are thick, round and sturdy. If they are crushed in any way or not firm, don’t buy them.)
  • 2 small cans of SLICED black Olives
  • 1 small onion, sliced
  • 1 small red pepper, sliced or you can use Roasted Peppers in a Jar — up to you.
  • 1 pack of Italian Style Pepperoni
  • 1 package of Italian Sausage — either ground or links. If you get links, you can squeeze the sausage from the Casing or you can cook it in the Casing and then slice to the thickness you desire.
  • Whatever other toppings you want — Banana Peppers, anchovies, etc.
  • 1 — (8ounce) bag of Shredded Mozzarella Cheese (Unless you want more, then grab a bigger bag.)
  • 1/2 stick of butter.

 

SAUCE

  • 2 small Cans of Tomato Sauce
  • 2-4 gloves of Garlic
  • Cayenne (optional)
  • Red Pepper flakes to taste
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 TBSP Basil

 

DIRECTIONS for SAUCE

We are going to go ahead and mix up the sauce and put it on the stove to boil, and then to simmer while we prep the mushrooms and everything else.  So, with that being said, put the Sauce, minced or chopped Garlic, (optional, Cayenne), Salt, Red Pepper Flakes and Basil in a pan. Cover. I actually bring it to a low boil and then let it just sit in it’s own heat until I’m ready for it.

 

TOPPINGS

Now, let’s start frying your Sausage. And working on those Mushrooms…..

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We need to carve out the insides of the mushroom and remove the stem. For this, you are going to use a spoon, whatever size you are comfortable with. Just start by gently flicking out the stem and then scraping out the darker stuff like so….

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Be CAREFUL not to dig your spoon too deep. You do not want to puncture the bottom or the sides. We want to trap the toppings in, not have them running all over. Basically, you are making a bowl with a mushroom or a mushroom bowl, lol.

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This is what you will end up with, (the picture above). I don’t know if you can tell, but that bowl is pretty deep or deep enough for me to stack all my toppings in and for them to stay in.

Now, you most likely have a plate of this left….

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It’s up to you what you do with it but I always save it. I will add it to scrambled eggs or use it to make a Cream of Mushroom soup or I even add it to the Vegetable Soup I make and freeze for my lunches through the week. You can saute it, and add it back to the pizza but to me that’s a waste when we already have mushrooms — as a foundation for my pizzas– So, why not stretch it into another recipe.

Now that you have your foundation spooned out, place them on a Cookie Sheet.Start building your Pizza. I add a few tablespoons of Sauce or more first. Then I lay out the pepperoni — ON THE SAUCE– and BEFORE THE CHEESE. Pepperoni will help flavor your Sauce, so to me, this is the best way. Sprinkle on some Mozzarella Cheese. You decide how much. CUSTOMIZE this to your liking. If you LOVE Pepperoni, add some more on top the cheese. Next, add some Sausage, Black Olives, Red Pepper and Onion. Anchovies, if you use these things, are to be added last. 

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Once all your toppings are on, slice the butter and toss it in between the mushrooms on the pan. Bake at 400 degrees for about 15-20 minutes. It doesn’t take mushrooms long to cook at all. And the time will depend on how your oven cooks. You will be able to tell when they are done though. Should be some good juices in the pan and the mushrooms will loose some of their firmness.

Remove from the oven and eat. Let me know what you think because I can’t get enough of these! And if you have any left over, they are even better the next day!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Seafood, The Hungry Hen

Hot Cheesy, Vegetable Seafood Dip

It was right before Super Bowl and I decide, to hell with an actual meal, let’s do some dips and such. Well, if I’m going to do a Dip, I want to make sure it’s something I don’t get too often. That’s when my brain takes a plunge into the ocean. Next bright idea : Let’s do seafood! Yum!

I scan recipe after recipe until I find one that is Gluten Free AND something that has a wow-factor. I rush off to the grocery store, after bragging to others coming that THIS, THIS is WHAT I’m making. Unfortunately, I should have read the recipe better because I still had to make my mortgage payment for this month. What does that mean? It means that the Dip called for two not-s0-common cheeses that are priced pretty high where I’m from. If the Recipe would have called for a 1/2 here or there, I would have went for it, but it called for 5 cups (doubling the recipe) for one and that one was up there in Cost.

Because I had already bragged, already splurged on the not-so-cheap seafood, I had to think of something. What I thought of was what I came up with BELOW. And before you bat an eye, let me tell you that this stuff was AMAZING!!!! We used tortilla chips but you can use other chips, veggie sticks or french bread. And with the left overs, I started doing all types of stuff– stuffing mushrooms and fish. Everyone loved it. LOVED it! And while I still used SOME of the expensive cheese, I only used a small amount — considering what the recipe originally called for.

The pictures are not so great, so forgive me, but enjoy because this was so totally worth it.

img_7573Okay, we are throwing ALL of the Ingredients below (except the Seafood) into a Crockpot.

Ingredients

  • 8 oz Cream Cheese
  • 16 oz Sour Cream
  • 1 Stick of Butter
  • 10 oz Frozen Chopped Spinach
  • 14 oz Artichoke Hearts, Chopped
  • 8 oz Italian Style Shredded Cheese (Kroger carries this.)
  • 1-2 cloves chopped raw garlic
  • 4 oz REAL Lump Crab Meat (If you can’t find lump, just make sure its real, uncooked and fresh.
  • 1/2 Ib Shrimp (No Shell) Chopped
  • 4 oz Can of Clams. I used the whole ones– not the minced. Drain these, too.
  • 1/2 cup celery chopped
  • 1/2 cup red bell pepper chopped
  • 1 TBSP Jalapeno minced
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped Onion
  • 1/4 tsp Parsley
  • 2 tsp Old Bay Seasoning
  • Cubed Gouda. I used .53 oz and .44 oz. So target it near those amounts. If you get a little over or less, don’t worry. Shouldn’t make a difference. This was the expensive stuff, but a little, went a long way.
  • 8 oz Shredded Parmesan (Buy the fresh near the other shredded cheeses)

 

As I said before, throw everything but the Seafood into a crock pot. Let it melt and heat up. The amount of time will depend on how fast your Crock cooks. Make sure to go in here and there and stir. Just make sure nothing sticks. Nothing in mine did, but you never know. Add seafood 15 minutes before serving.

 

Let me know what you think. We loved it. And save those left overs. We stuffed mushrooms with them, topped baked potatoes with it, even added some to our scrambled eggs.

 

 

 

 

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Posted in The Hungry Hen, Uncategorized

Historical Menus : How the Politicians Did It Back in the Day & the Recipe of Burgoo

A lot of Political unrest these days. We assumed it would all be over by now, but unlike anything I remember before, it isn’t. A lot of bad people in the world, too. And those people are using this election to justify their unlawful acts, their bad behavior. We should have an issue with that, we should “all” have an issue with that, but strangely, the Mainstream Media would lead us to think we are indeed, divided on that as well.

 

Regardless, I thought it would be fun, in honor of our next President being elected, Donald Trump, that I post a little historical info on how the Politicians used to win votes way back in the day. Interested?

 

So, how “did” the Politicians win votes way back in the day? Through the stomach, that’s how. Through the stomach.

 

Even before 1758, men like George Washington figured out, the best way to catch the faith of a voter, was by giving him a damn good meal. Food and, of course Alcohol, made everything so much better.

Back then, BBQ’s were held and Politicians traveled to each and every one. With them, I really want to emphasize, alcohol. Lots and lots of Spirits. They had such a thing called Voters Run, and if that didn’t do the trick, they’d often carry with them wine, beer cider and well, cake–because everyone loves the guy who brings the alcohol and sweets to the party.

 

It was an all-out affair with big bands, cannons, and, while Candidates would speak of course, things didn’t shut down at dark. No, these shindigs used to roar right into the night.

 

According to the book, The American Heritage Cookbook, pages record one rallie making itself into history in 1840 when William Henry Harrison came to town to score some votes. In Albany, NY, they raised a Cabin, literally, and then partied down inside on corn bread, cheese and Hard Cider.

They had ginger cake, hoecake, and  served bacon with their cider in Columbus, Ohio.

Over in Wheeling, West Virginia, Harrisonites blew the numbers off the charts with 30,000 people. It is said they had 360 hams, 26 sheep & 20 calves, 1500 pounds of beef, 8,000 pounds of bread, more than 1,000 pounds of cheese and a hodgepodge of 4,500 pies.

Not to mention alcohol! I mean, I did say alcohol, right?

 

Now days, illegal voting seems to be one of the big screamers of every government election. Without Legal Identification Cards, Socials and all that, how did they stop illegal voting back in the day?

Back then, Henry Clay was recorded saying this about an election held down South, “I have just witnessed that strange thing, a Kentucky Election…Whisky and Apple Toddy flowed through the cities and villages like Euphrates through Ancient Babylon…drunkenness stalked triumphant…. Runners, each with a whiskey bottle poking its long, jolly neck from his pocket, were employed in bribing voters, and each party kept half-a-dozen bullies…to flog every poor fellow that should attempt to vote illegally; a half-hundredweight of mortar would searee fill up the chinks in the skulls that were broken.”

 

These affairs became so big that huge trenches, recorded being dug like ditches, two and a half feet deep and wide were built. Inside, those trenches burned to blazes with fire until massive beds of fiery coal replaced the flames. Frames made from green wood was used to roast huge amounts of meat. Texas learned this from Mexican Indians and soon, the word Barbecue was coined from the Spanish word, barbacoa, which meant, frame.

 

A historical menu taken from a Texas BBQ,…..

  • Barbecued Spareribs
  • Four-Bean Salad
  • Buttermilk Biscuit
  • Individual Pecan Pies
  • Coffee
  • Hard Cider
  • Mint Juleps
  • Burgoo
  • Corn Sticks
  • Coleslaw
  • Apple Pie pr Deep-Dish Blueberry Pie
  • Hickory Nut Cake or Kentucky Bourban Cake

 

 

 

See the word, Burgoo, above? This was a very popular dish that most menus revolved around, if those menus were meant to feed vast amounts of people. This recipe is so massive, I had to share it. But first, a little history about where this dish originated from….

 

Sometime around the mid-eighteenth century is when Burgoo was born. It’was often seen cooking on Ships. Once you see the recipe below, you’ll be able to see why. Anyway, having been developed in America, and soon a staple of Kentucky, who, in turn, decided to thicken the porridge up even more so by adding every kind of meat imaginable, the dish was made in enormous quantities. So, in short, it’s a monster-batch of porridge made up of everything– chicken, squirrel, pig, beef, lamb and whatever else they had. Not counting the massive amounts of vegetable and seasonings. And for those who don’t know what porridge is, that’s a Soft food made by boiling oatmeal or other meal or legumes in water or milk until thick. (Definition take from WordWeb.)

 

Potatoes may have replaced the oatmeal and legumes once Kentucky got it’s hands on it. Often times, it could include up to 800 pounds of beef, 240 pounds of chicken and a ton of potatoes. This stuff was whipped up and served at every kind of social from Church Gathering, Horse Sale, Derby Day or Picnic.

 

Ingredients have also been added to make them optional in case you cant get, well, for example, vegetable oil has been added in case you do not use Lard. Canned Vegetables have been added in case you aren’t cutting up fresh ones.

 

Now, to the recipe…which serves 20 and not a 1000…which means it has been shrunk down a bit. And you can shrink it more, if need be, by cutting the ingredients in half.

 

  • 5 tablespoons bacon fat, lard or vegetable oil
  • 2 pounds of lean shin bones of beef with meat
  • 1 pound shoulder of veal
  • 2 medium-sized chickens, quartered
  • 4 quarts water
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 4 cups of chopped onions
  • 1 clove chopped clove of garlic
  • 2 cups of diced potatoes
  • 2 cups diced Carrots
  • 1 bunch of celery, with tops, chopped
  • 1 quart skinned, ripe tomatoes or 2 cans (1 pound, 3 ounces) tomatoes
  • 2 large, chopped green peppers
  • 1 pint of fresh butter beans or 1 package of frozen
  • 1 small pod red pepper or 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 1 small onion, stuck with four cloves (This would be a wild onion, no doubt) Substitute: Green Onion
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/4 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 cups okra, sliced, or 1 package frozen
  • 6 ears of corn, kernels cut from the cob, or 2 packs of frozen corn
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup parsley, chopped

 

Directions

 

  • Heat 3 tablespoons bacon fat, lard or oil in a kettle.
  • Add beef and veal and brown well.
  • Add chickens, water, and salt, and cook over low heat, covered, until very tender.
  • Remove meat and chicken to a tray and, when cool enough to handle, remove and discard all bones and chicken skin. Cut meat into sizable pieces, then return to broth.
  • Cook onions in remaining 2 tablespoons of bacon fat, lard or oil until they are limp. Add to broth, along with garlic, potatoes, celery,tomatoes, carrots, green peppers, butter beans, red pepper, onion stuck (or green onion), cloves, bay leaf, brown sugar and ground pepper. Cook slowly for 2 hours, stirring occasionally.
  • Then, add okra and corn and cook 15 minutes longer.
  • Before serving, in a bowl, combine butter and flour, working the mixture together until well blended. Stir into Burgoo and cook, stirring constantly, until Burgoo has thickened.
  • Taste for seasoning.
  • Before serving, sprinkle with parsley.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in The Hammered Hen, The Hen House, The Hungry Hen, The Scoop from the Coop, Things to Crow About

Bitterless Coffee & Sweet Tea

There’s a trick Grandma used to do that no one seems to know anymore. A way she made her coffee that made it taste unlike anything we’ve tasted since. Well, unless you know the trick, which, now days, quite a few are catching on thanks to Pinterest and Social Media.

A pinch of salt– add a pinch of salt, or, about 1/4th teaspoon for those who need exact measurements, to the coffee after you put it in the filter. If you are using the a reusable K-pod, for those with Keurigs, then do the exact same thing, only a smaller amount.

A pinch of salt will kick the bitter right out of your cups.

For those who can’t drink coffee because it causes heartburn, add a pinch or so of baking soda. Use this, instead of salt, which will actually combat the bitterness AND help illuminate the heartburn!

And if you want something that tastes expensively delicious but without the price tag or brand name, and that doesn’t have that nasty chemical aftertaste a lot of flavored coffees have, add cinnamon and or nutmeg to the coffee — not the cup, but let it brew with the coffee itself. Play with the amount– a couple of sprinkles or just a dash. Add one or both. You can even add a splash of extract like Vanilla.

I’ve made my coffee like this for years– with baking sofa, cinnamon and sometimes nutmeg. People always ask where I bought my coffee and those who can’t stand flavors, loved mine. They’re shocked with I tell them the Brand– one of the most common but cheapest on the grocery store shelf. Not to mention, shocked at the flavor.

I’m a cream in the cup kind of girl but for those times when I run out, a cup of coffee made this smooth, I can drink it black, no problem.

For tea, do the same thing. What happens is, the Baking Soda and or Salt attacks the Tannins in the tea, which is what can make Tea a bit bitter. Of course, the Tannins in the Tea is what Herbalists swoon over. They are what makes the healthy properties in Tea and what makes those properties combat so many ugly unwanteds. To read more about Tannins, check out:

The Healing Properties of Black & Green Tea

So give it a try next time you brew up a batch and let us know if you have any tricks you’ve been adding to yours! 😜

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Posted in Carnivore, Chicken, Historical, Rabbit Recipes, The Hungry Hen

Maryland–Styled Fried Rabbit

This is an historical dish that was actually made for chicken but it was listed under Poultry & Game—which to me, means, anything else can work too. And, in case you don’t know, anything made for chicken, easily converts to rabbit. If you want to use it for chicken, though, go ahead, but I’m shoving it into my Rabbit files because anymore, I prefer Rabbit to chicken any ol’ day of the week. *winks*

Also, my picture, is without the Sauce on top. I had hoped to get one before and after but my family eats everything up so quick, I was only able to grab the before. Regardless, enjoy!

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This recipe came from, The American Heritage Cookbook. This recipe is a historical favorite.  I have adapted certain things for current times. For example, if it says paper bag, I changed it into zip lock.

Ingredients

  • 6 Strips of Bacon
  • Butter or Vegetable Oil
  • 3/4 cup of Flour (More or less)
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon Pepper
  • 3 – 3 1/2 pounds Rabbit (Or frying chicken)
  • 2 TBSP Flour
  • 2 cups Half and Half

Note: I add a bit more salt and pepper. I also add a tablespoon (More or less) of Paprika, Garlic powder and whatever else I have a mind to.

Directions

  1. Fry Bacon in a large skillet until brown. Remove. Drain and set aside.
  2. Add enough butter or oil to bacon drippings to make 1 inch of fat in skillet.
  3. Dump 3/4 cup of flour, salt, pepper and whatever other seasonings into a plastic bag. Shake.
  4. Add Rabbit pieces or chicken pieces. Shake.
  5. When Fat in the skillet is good and hot, add rabbit and fry on both sides till brown. Now, cover skillet, reduce heat and cook over low heat for about 25 minutes or until tender when tested with a fork.
  6. Transfer to a hot platter and keep warm.
  7. Pour off all but 4 tablespoons of fat, stir in 2 tablespoons of flour and cook for a few minutes. Then pour in the half and half. Cook, stirring constantly until the sauce is smooth and thick. Season to taste. Pour sauce over hot rabbit or chicken and garnish with bacon strips or crumble with the bacon. Serves 4
Posted in From Scratch, Historical, Seasonings, Sauces, Dressings & Mixes, The Hungry Hen

The Buckhorn Inn House Dressing

IStsducc2cmcp81000000000When I was a kid and my Momma moved us back to Virginia from North Carolina, goin’ out to eat was a treat…one that came fewer than the risin’ of a  Blue Moon. When we first came up, we stayed out in Craigsville where Grandma was married to her second husband, Maxie. There, they both had a match box for a trailer. To be truthful, I don’t think they make things that small anymore. Maxie was usually gone—Gone Drinkin’—and most times when he was back, him and Grandma spent fightin’ up a storm – about him bein’ gone off drinkin’. Their fightin’ never bothered us kids none, because we actually liked ol’ Maxie. He was a man rarely seen and of very few words but when he was around, he wasn’t grouchy like most adults were back in them days. lol. He never took a strap to us or made us shush because even our breathin’ got on his nerves.

Now, while Maxie and Grandma had their problems – if he had taken her with him, I’m sure all would have been right in her world—but as I said, he was good to us. Once, I remember him makin’ her drive us out to Highland County, just because Maxie had a hankerin’ for some bread. That bread is still famous around these parts. It’s a heavy Yeast Bread that some might call Depression Food. The trip to Highland was just the icing on the cake. Maxie decided to surprise us with a trip to the infamous, Buckhorn Inn, which is actually on out there in Churchville, Virginia.

Yup, it’s still there and at the time of writin’ this piece, it’s for sale. More on that later, though.

That day, some of us cousins piled up in Grandma’s little ol’ Chevette while she drove Maxie and the rest of us wherever he wanted to go. Tons of windin’ backroads, skyscrapin’ mountains and too-many-to count-pit-stops for Maxie, who had to relieve  himself all too often of all that Old Milwaukee beer. snickers

Once it was all said and done, though, Maxie treated us to a buffet supper at, The Buckhorn Inn, located at 2487 Hankey Mountain Hwy, Churchville, VA 24421. Now, while I can’t tell you what in the world the food is like now, I can tell you it was all home cooked and delicious back then. Not that Maxie would have known it that night. He kept tellin’ the Waitress he wasn’t eattin’ because he had bread and beer in the car, lol. Still, he sat there patiently with a drunken grin on his face while we scoffed all that food down and got him more than his money’s worth. 

ISat48r2n4tip10000000000The Buckhorn Inn, built in 1859, is rumored to be haunted, not that the ghost stories frightened anyone off from eattin’ there back in the day. I think the ghost or one of them is a soldier?  Here are the claims of a Psychic and Paranormal Investigation done there. I can’t raise my right hand and swear on any of that. But it is interestin’ for those who crave somethin’ ghoulish. As I said above, it is FOR SALE. Sadly, since I was there as a kid, it has passed through the hands of many, many Owners. Some good, some not so great. Shame. Its in great shape and has awesome potential. Way above my price range but if there are any filthy rich gazillion-aires out there that just want to throw some money my way, I’d be happy to take the place on, lol.

Now that I have drug you down memory lane, let’s get to the point of this article. Few years back, while stummblin’ around my husband’s hometown of Deerfield, Virginia, I got my hands on a cookbook published by one of the church’s out there. (Deerfield Church of God) Inside was a recipe for The Buckhorn Inn’s House Dressing. That took me down memory lane, which made me just drag you down kickin’ and screamin’ and well, now here we are… to the recipe bit. I’m not sure if those who own it now use any of the old recipes, but here’s one for history’s sake. Enjoy. It’s a simple one but who knows, you may like it.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Sugar
  • 3/4 cup Ketchup
  • 1/2 tsp. Garlic Salt
  • 1/4 cup Oil
  • 1/4 cup Vinegar

Directions

Stir all ingredients well and put in a Jar for storage. Refrigerate.

Note: I just add it all to a Mason Jar, put lid on, and shake for dear life.

 

 

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Posted in Depression Food, Pork, Soups & Stews, The Hungry Hen, Veggies w/ Meat

Split Pea Soup

0e0ebc60-aa8c-4fce-9548-60eac4bcbd5e Not everyone makes this anymore but when I was growing up, it was one of very few things my mother threw together. She learned it from Grandma and Grandma learned it from those before her. Its really simple to make. Inexpensive. Not the prettiest dish, which is why I didn’t even bother putting a picture of my own on here. I used one from Betty Crocker, although the recipe I am using comes from an old, vintage Cookbook called, Cookbook: Nutritious Cooking the Waterless Way. This was put out by Ekco Prudential back in the 1950’s. One of my favorite yard sale finds. Anyone who frequents this blog knows, I dig the vintage cookbooks because the ingredients were simple, as were the instructions, and everything was from scratch. Verses now, we have all of these processed ingredients, which I’d rather get away from.

And while this particular recipe can look kind of unappealing in a pot, I think it’s important to include. Its simple, filling, great for the frugal and easy to make from scratch. It does taste great and to be honest, you can jazz it up as far as looks go by adding big chunks of carrots, celery or whatever your heart’s desire. My Grandmother and them weren’t into pretty. They were into filling the stomach in a way that was as cheap as possible. My Grandmother, who grew up during the Depression, was famous for cooking on a dime. This may have been one she would have called Depression Food.

 

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Dried Split Peas
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1 quart Water
  • 1 Bay Leaf
  • 2 cups Milk
  • Small Ham bone, Bacon Rind or Salt Pork
  • 1 Onion, Chopped
  • 1 Carrot, chopped

Directions

Wash and pick over dried peas. Cover with water and allow to stand and soak over night. (If salt pork is used, it should be cut in small pieces and browed.) Place soaked peas with an additional 1 1/2 cups of water in a 3 quart vegetable pan, over MEDIUM heat until cover vibrates or vapors escape, then reduce heat to LOW and simmer 2 hours. Remove ham bone and put remainder through a steamer – strainer pan, using masher to puree. Add milk and a dash of pepper to puree. Heat and serve. 8 servings.

 

Note: Now days we have hand mixers, etc. instead of steamers or strainer pans. You also don’t have to puree this. My Grandmother never did.